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Magazines

Page history last edited by Jeff Martinek 7 years, 7 months ago

 

 [4] 

 

Summary  

 

A magazine can best be translated into the word "storehouse".  In today's modern world magazines are accessed through online references and considered to be accessed thorugh televsion broadcasting stations as well. In a traditional sense, a magazine is considered to be printed out onto paper material. It contains more informatio and provides more indepth news than the traditional newspaper. It is a source that typically focuses on popular trends and issues and provides the background news for current and past events. [1]

  

 

The leaders of five major magazine companies: Charles H. Townsend, Conde Nast; Cathie Black, Hearst Magazines; Jack Griffin, Meredith Corporation; Ann Moore, Time Inc.; and Jann Wenner, Wenner Media - talk about the vitality of magazines as a medium. [5]

 


 

Types of Magazines

 

Trade Magazines are pecific to a certain job or business.  The content  is focused on job-related subject matter.  The readers of trade magazines are those people who have specific occupations that make the audience more controlled.  They are usually provided at no cost to the readers. [1]

 

Organization Magazines  can be separated into three categories as well: public relations, association and society, and custom. Organizations or companies that are trying to self-promote their organization publish public relations magazines. External publications may be targeted toward the company’s clients while internal publications would be targeted more towards the company’s employees. These magazines will provide news information and several how-to articles for the readers that work in a specific industry with advertising content focused on those industries or trades including job notices. [1]

 

Consumer Magazines are the most common type of magazine.  They are found in isles of the grocery store or on newsstands around the world.  Consumer magazines are broken down into a variety of different categories and target specific reading audiences such as: homes, men’s, women’s, fashion, teen, entertainment, gossip, sports, political,  and thenews .  They can be bought by subscription or as a single issue.  [1] 

 

Association and Society Magazines  usually provided as part of a membership.  For example, a membership handbook from the YMCA-YWCA.  The main purpose of these is to boost the organization.  Advertising for these type of magazines can be paid for with the membership dues. [1]

 

A Sponsored or Custom Magazine  can be received as a result of a purchase or using a particular product.  They are primarily free of charge, but they can be sold through subscriptions or even on newsstands.  They are used to promote the use of a company’s product. [1]


  

History

 

The first two published "magazines" were created by Richard Steele and Joseph Addison in England.  Steele first began publishing a magazine called the Tatler in 1709 and then joined Addison who had previously writter for the Tatler,  in publishing the Spectator in 1711.  These publications were different then the publications of newspapers because they hinted on more of an emphasis on enlightenment and entertainment then on pure information or news. These same concepts are how American magazines began as well. Americans magazines began with a similiar concept.  [3]

  

The Eighteenth Century  

Throughout the eighteenth century, magazines were established for the need to voice political opinion.  The first magazines in America were established in 1741.  Of them included Benjamin Franklin’s, The General Magazine, and Andrew Bradford’s, American Magazine.  Magazines in the eighteenth century were generally harder to come by because of the little literacy in America at the time and many people could not afford to buy them.  Most of the early magazines were made of reprints of essays or material that were originally published in British magazines, books, or pamphlets.  There was a lot of labor that was needed to produce a magazine before the 1800s.  The printing press had not evolved much from the days of Gutenberg in 1448.  Each type was set by hand, each page, letter, and everything was formally set in the exact positioning and then printed.  Thus, this made the design of magazines back then very plain.  They were usually small print that was very difficult to read and if there were any illustrations, they were usually found on only the cover page.  The illustrations were made from rough woodcuts or, if publishers could afford them, copperplate engravings. [3] 

  

The General Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, For all the British Plantations in America , which was printed and sold by Benjamin Franklin in 1741, was the first magazine to be published in the British Colonies, and it carried the crest of the Prince of Wales. (Bettmann/Corbis)

"The General Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, For all the British Plantations in America , which was printed and sold by Benjamin Franklin in 1741, was the first magazine to be published in the British Colonies, and it carried the crest of the Prince of Wales. (Bettmann/Corbis)" [3]

 

 

The Nineteenth Century 

 In the nineteenth century, literacy began to increase, therefore magazine publishing increased as well.  From 1825-1850, over 5,000 new magazines were launched that sought out a wider variety of readers. Two of the most popular mass-circulation publications of that time were Ladies Home Journal and Saturday Evening Post.   These were published by Cyrus H. K. Curtis in 1879.  After publication reached above 500,000, Edward Bok took over and began to cover new interests to reach out and appeal to women.  Ladies Home Journal was the first magazine to reach a circulation of more than one million.  By the end of the nineteenth century, magazines began to discover using advertisements to pay for the publication of the magazine.  This made costs less for the consumers and also made them cheaper to make. [3]

 

The Twentieth Century

The turn of the twentieth century really heightened the readership of magazines. From the 1920's-1960's 60 percent of American's read a magaize regularly. Magazines were read more than books and fewer were reading the newspaper. [2] The wide availability of magazines made it easier for people to get the magazines to read.  Magazines began to incorporate shorter articles.  Reader’s Digest was one of the first successful magazines of the twentieth century.  It was created by, DeWitt Wallace and his wife Lila Acheson Wallace, in 1922.  Another well-known magazine of the time was Time in 1923.  This magazine was founded by Henry Luce and Briton Hadden.  Magazines like Sports Illustrated in 1952 opened up a new targeted group for the magazine medium.  By the end of the Twentieth century, photography became more involved in magazine layout.  Photography was able to be transferred easier to paper that cut the cost of providing images for the magazine. [3]

  

The Twenty-First Century

The twenty-first century in the United States has come with frequent access to entertainment via the internet but magzines have still retained their popularity. To do so, the newstands constanly feauture new titles regularly which will create competition. New technology is always advancing and will create easier access to online magazines and production faster and easier as well spiking the interest of many readers. [3]

 

External Links

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pW2PXf5Mzsw&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MU8d4bRHLPU&feature=related


  

Resources  

[1] Benedict, Stacey. “Magazine Industry.” Encyclopedia of Communication and Information. Ed. Jorge Reina Schement. Vol. 2. New York: Macmillan Reference USA,2002. 568-573. 3 vols. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Gale. Iowa Wesleyan College. 18 Nov. 2008  

[2] Garvey, Ellen Gruber. “Magazines.” Dictionary of American History. Ed. Stanley I. Kutler. Vol. 5. 3rd ed. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2003. 191-196. 10vols. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Gale. Iowa Wesleyan College. 18 Nov. 2008  

[3] Lauder, Tracy. “Magazine Industry, History of.” Encyclopedia of Communication and Information. Ed. Jorge Reina Schement. Vol. 2. New York: Mcmillian Reference USA, 2002. 575-579. 3 vols. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Gale. Iowa Wesleyan College. 18 Nov. 2008

[4]Nylind, Linda. “Ask the experts: How to break into magazine journalism”. Photo. The Careers Blog. 2012. 13 November 2012. <http://carers.guardian.co.uk/careers-blog/ask-the-experts-getting-onto-a-magazine>

[5] Townsend, Charles H; Nast, Conde; Black, Cathie; Hearst Magazines; Griffin, Jack; Meredith Corporation; Moore, Ann; Time Inc; Wenner, Jann; Wenner Media. "Magazines, The Power of Print". 2010. Web. 13 November 2012.


  

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